Event Title

Symbiotic Cell Cycle Regulation in Cnidaria and Symbiodinium: A Bioinformatic Exploration

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

With increasing ocean and surface temperatures due to climate change, coral reefs are suffering from rapidly changing environments. Single-celled photosynthetic residents of coral cells, known as zooxanthellae, participate in a symbiotic relationship with the coral, providing energy for coral cells via photosynthesis, but are expelled when the coral becomes too stressed (from changing temperature, pH, and/or other factors). Cell cycle regulation between the zooxanthellae and coral, including cell growth and division of zooxanthellae by environmental cues, however, is not well understood. In this study, we are looking into the specific environmental cues from host coral to zooxanthellae. We have explored the newly sequenced zooxanthellae genome, Symbiodinium, for likely cell cycle genes, such as CDKs and cyclins, and phylogenetically classified these genes with similar genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and humans. With these results, we will be able to test the environmental cues by analyzing expression of specific genes involved in cell cycle regulation in vivo.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Biology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

833

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Symbiotic Cell Cycle Regulation in Cnidaria and Symbiodinium: A Bioinformatic Exploration

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

With increasing ocean and surface temperatures due to climate change, coral reefs are suffering from rapidly changing environments. Single-celled photosynthetic residents of coral cells, known as zooxanthellae, participate in a symbiotic relationship with the coral, providing energy for coral cells via photosynthesis, but are expelled when the coral becomes too stressed (from changing temperature, pH, and/or other factors). Cell cycle regulation between the zooxanthellae and coral, including cell growth and division of zooxanthellae by environmental cues, however, is not well understood. In this study, we are looking into the specific environmental cues from host coral to zooxanthellae. We have explored the newly sequenced zooxanthellae genome, Symbiodinium, for likely cell cycle genes, such as CDKs and cyclins, and phylogenetically classified these genes with similar genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and humans. With these results, we will be able to test the environmental cues by analyzing expression of specific genes involved in cell cycle regulation in vivo.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/22