Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Since the beginning of WWII in 1937, Japan has faced a number of difficult decisions regarding its economy, environment and nationalistic interests. During the war, the Japanese economy experienced rapid development. Its nationalism and desire to meet the West in economic and industrial levels drove its extreme postwar economic development which, along with its nuclear reliance, has spurred a number of environmental issues, including population growth, increased fossil fuel emissions, waste management and overfishing practices. We plan to explore each of these issues that have resulted from Japans rapid industrial expansion, with a focus on its overfishing practices, specifically regarding marine mammals. Japans economy is extremely dependent on its fishing practices and is currently one of the worlds leaders in the international fish trade. However, overfishing practices have depleted fish populations in surrounding oceans, which has in turn created negative media portrayals of Japanese fishing practices in other countries. As a result, people have become more globally aware of Japans aggressive and seemingly heartless slaughter of dolphins and whales. In particular, since the release of the Academy-Award winning film, The Cove, the general public have become much more concerned with dolphin-fishing practices in Japan. Despite this public criticism, the Japanese government has refused to alter laws around whaling and dolphin fishing practices because of the detrimental economic effects and their nationalism. However, there have been numerous efforts to reduce their effects, including increased media coverage, which has been making positive impacts.

Faculty Sponsor

Russ Cole

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

448

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

The Ecological Effects of Overfishing in Japan

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Since the beginning of WWII in 1937, Japan has faced a number of difficult decisions regarding its economy, environment and nationalistic interests. During the war, the Japanese economy experienced rapid development. Its nationalism and desire to meet the West in economic and industrial levels drove its extreme postwar economic development which, along with its nuclear reliance, has spurred a number of environmental issues, including population growth, increased fossil fuel emissions, waste management and overfishing practices. We plan to explore each of these issues that have resulted from Japans rapid industrial expansion, with a focus on its overfishing practices, specifically regarding marine mammals. Japans economy is extremely dependent on its fishing practices and is currently one of the worlds leaders in the international fish trade. However, overfishing practices have depleted fish populations in surrounding oceans, which has in turn created negative media portrayals of Japanese fishing practices in other countries. As a result, people have become more globally aware of Japans aggressive and seemingly heartless slaughter of dolphins and whales. In particular, since the release of the Academy-Award winning film, The Cove, the general public have become much more concerned with dolphin-fishing practices in Japan. Despite this public criticism, the Japanese government has refused to alter laws around whaling and dolphin fishing practices because of the detrimental economic effects and their nationalism. However, there have been numerous efforts to reduce their effects, including increased media coverage, which has been making positive impacts.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/216