Event Title

Changes in Human Capital in Latin America

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Throughout the world low levels of human capital have hindered economic development in poor countries. In Chile in 2009 the public expenditure on education per student as a percentage of GDP per capita was 13.68%[1]. GDP growth that year was 4.3%. Other notable factors affecting GDP per capita growth are employment, technology, size of population, trade balance, and investor confidence. This paper aims to break down the most significant factors affecting human capital levels in Latin American countries. The hypothesis in place asserts that the factors affecting human capital will have a significant impact on the growth rate of GDP per capita. This impact will be evaluated by comparing these Latin American countries to newly developed ones. The two primary factors affecting human capital are health and education, which will be dissected further into specific variables. Data will be obtained from GAPMINDER, which uses information collected by IARC, IHME and the World Bank. GAPMINDER pools an extensive amount of data from these various sources into an easily accessible format. The results of this paper will provide insight into improving the GDP growth of developing countries.

Faculty Sponsor

Daniel LaFave

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Economics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1164

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

Changes in Human Capital in Latin America

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Throughout the world low levels of human capital have hindered economic development in poor countries. In Chile in 2009 the public expenditure on education per student as a percentage of GDP per capita was 13.68%[1]. GDP growth that year was 4.3%. Other notable factors affecting GDP per capita growth are employment, technology, size of population, trade balance, and investor confidence. This paper aims to break down the most significant factors affecting human capital levels in Latin American countries. The hypothesis in place asserts that the factors affecting human capital will have a significant impact on the growth rate of GDP per capita. This impact will be evaluated by comparing these Latin American countries to newly developed ones. The two primary factors affecting human capital are health and education, which will be dissected further into specific variables. Data will be obtained from GAPMINDER, which uses information collected by IARC, IHME and the World Bank. GAPMINDER pools an extensive amount of data from these various sources into an easily accessible format. The results of this paper will provide insight into improving the GDP growth of developing countries.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/8