Event Title

Phonological and Semantic Effects on False Memory

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 1:55 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

False memory is a recollection of an event that did not actually occur, or in this study the recollection of a word that did not actually appear on a list. The goal of the study was to examine what types of relationships result in the highest rate of false memory. In the study participants studied 10 lists of 9 items (such as bat, call, claw, furry, meow, pounce, sat, scratch and stray) related to a non-presented word (called a lure item, such as cat). For each lure item, such as dog, five lists were developed: associative (A, e.g., leash, bark), associative + categorical (A+C; e.g., wolf, fox), orthographic/phonological (OP; e.g., dot, log), and hybrid lists that contained both A and OP items or A+C and OP items. All of the lists were matched along lexical and semantic factors and the same lures were used across the different list types. Similarity at a categorical level contributes more to false memory than similarity at an associative or orthographic/phonological level and hybrid lists did not differ from pure lists. This replicates the feature boost that reflects the effects of sharing both meaning and association resulting in higher recall reported in an earlier study.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1138

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Apr 30th, 11:00 AM Apr 30th, 1:55 PM

Phonological and Semantic Effects on False Memory

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

False memory is a recollection of an event that did not actually occur, or in this study the recollection of a word that did not actually appear on a list. The goal of the study was to examine what types of relationships result in the highest rate of false memory. In the study participants studied 10 lists of 9 items (such as bat, call, claw, furry, meow, pounce, sat, scratch and stray) related to a non-presented word (called a lure item, such as cat). For each lure item, such as dog, five lists were developed: associative (A, e.g., leash, bark), associative + categorical (A+C; e.g., wolf, fox), orthographic/phonological (OP; e.g., dot, log), and hybrid lists that contained both A and OP items or A+C and OP items. All of the lists were matched along lexical and semantic factors and the same lures were used across the different list types. Similarity at a categorical level contributes more to false memory than similarity at an associative or orthographic/phonological level and hybrid lists did not differ from pure lists. This replicates the feature boost that reflects the effects of sharing both meaning and association resulting in higher recall reported in an earlier study.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/46