Event Title

Gertrude Bell and the Formation of the Modern State of Iraq

Presenter Information

Alice Gauvin, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 241

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:25 AM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

In 1921, in the aftermath of the First World War, the British established the Kingdom of Iraq, and placed Faisal I, who had led the Arab Revolt against the Turks during the First World War, on its throne. Perhaps no one played a more active role in choosing and instating Faisal as the new leader of Iraq than Gertrude Bell, Britains Oriental Secretary in Baghdad, and one of the most enthusiastic and talented amateur diplomats throughout the history of the modern Middle East. Fluent in Arabic, more at ease and engaged in the company of sheikhs than in the presence of her own countrywomen, and with a greater knowledge of Iraq's people and cultures than any other Briton during her day, Bell played a crucial role in the creation of the modern Iraqi state.

Faculty Sponsor

John Turner

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. History Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1403

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:25 AM

Gertrude Bell and the Formation of the Modern State of Iraq

Diamond 241

In 1921, in the aftermath of the First World War, the British established the Kingdom of Iraq, and placed Faisal I, who had led the Arab Revolt against the Turks during the First World War, on its throne. Perhaps no one played a more active role in choosing and instating Faisal as the new leader of Iraq than Gertrude Bell, Britains Oriental Secretary in Baghdad, and one of the most enthusiastic and talented amateur diplomats throughout the history of the modern Middle East. Fluent in Arabic, more at ease and engaged in the company of sheikhs than in the presence of her own countrywomen, and with a greater knowledge of Iraq's people and cultures than any other Briton during her day, Bell played a crucial role in the creation of the modern Iraqi state.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/323