Event Title

The Privilege of Access: Class and the Ethics of Representation at the Sundance Film Festival

Presenter Information

Anna Mintz, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 221

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

Independent film festivals are a prime example of class contradictions in contemporary American culture. They have changed considerably with gaining popularity and, in effect, tainted the original mission of both the filmmakers and those who support them. The original mission of the Sundance Institute to provided a space for independent artists to explore their stories free from commercial and political pressures has been compromised by outside forces whose influence has grown with increasing popularity and profitability. By studying this particular festival, it will become clear how the cultural appropriation by the wealthier classes of Americans have co-opted the work and creativity of those less financially endowed. This says considerable amounts about access in the this country in general, including who deserves the first access to creativity and knowledge of the other, of which is many times created by those in stark opposition to those who wind up at their premiers. Although these films, and the mission of those who desire to expose them, are noble, the changing social fabric of the United States has changed their structure and form.

Faculty Sponsor

Ben Lisle

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. American Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

536

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 3:00 PM

The Privilege of Access: Class and the Ethics of Representation at the Sundance Film Festival

Diamond 221

Independent film festivals are a prime example of class contradictions in contemporary American culture. They have changed considerably with gaining popularity and, in effect, tainted the original mission of both the filmmakers and those who support them. The original mission of the Sundance Institute to provided a space for independent artists to explore their stories free from commercial and political pressures has been compromised by outside forces whose influence has grown with increasing popularity and profitability. By studying this particular festival, it will become clear how the cultural appropriation by the wealthier classes of Americans have co-opted the work and creativity of those less financially endowed. This says considerable amounts about access in the this country in general, including who deserves the first access to creativity and knowledge of the other, of which is many times created by those in stark opposition to those who wind up at their premiers. Although these films, and the mission of those who desire to expose them, are noble, the changing social fabric of the United States has changed their structure and form.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/9