Event Title

GIS Analysis of Historical Deforestation in Gambella Ethiopia: Focusing on Areas of Shea Disruption

Presenter Information

Marie Abrahams, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) refer to goods collected from forests such as wild plants and animals other than timber. NTFPs significantly contribute to the livelihoods of rural communities in developing countries, and are less destructive than other forms of forest use including logging, mining and agricultural transformation. Vitellaria paradoxa is a nut native to the Sahel region of Africa, and is a valuable non-timber forest product to rural communities. Previous research of the Gambella region indicates strong need for environmentally and economically sustainable forms of income, which increased shea butter production can provide. In addition, the market for shea nut is growing rapidly, fueled by increased international demand among cocoa and cosmetic industries. In Gambella Ethiopia, the production of shea butter has long been a source of income and a can its production can strengthen environmental protection initiatives, however rising human populations, ethnic conflicts, food insecurity and foreign agricultural investments have increased competition for land. Both small and large-scale human developments threaten wildlife and natural habitats in the Gambella region of Ethiopia today. This paper uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to explore the extent of land cover change and indigenous forest loss in western Ethiopia from 1995 to the present. This study uses satellite imagery to explore changes in the presence of vegetation between the 1995 dry season and the 2014 dry season. Drawing from previous research on shea availability in the Gambella region this research focuses on previously identified areas of identified shea resource. Findings suggest that human development and environmental degradation decrease the presence of indigenous forest may have adverse effects.

Faculty Sponsor

Manny Gimond

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

244

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

GIS Analysis of Historical Deforestation in Gambella Ethiopia: Focusing on Areas of Shea Disruption

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) refer to goods collected from forests such as wild plants and animals other than timber. NTFPs significantly contribute to the livelihoods of rural communities in developing countries, and are less destructive than other forms of forest use including logging, mining and agricultural transformation. Vitellaria paradoxa is a nut native to the Sahel region of Africa, and is a valuable non-timber forest product to rural communities. Previous research of the Gambella region indicates strong need for environmentally and economically sustainable forms of income, which increased shea butter production can provide. In addition, the market for shea nut is growing rapidly, fueled by increased international demand among cocoa and cosmetic industries. In Gambella Ethiopia, the production of shea butter has long been a source of income and a can its production can strengthen environmental protection initiatives, however rising human populations, ethnic conflicts, food insecurity and foreign agricultural investments have increased competition for land. Both small and large-scale human developments threaten wildlife and natural habitats in the Gambella region of Ethiopia today. This paper uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to explore the extent of land cover change and indigenous forest loss in western Ethiopia from 1995 to the present. This study uses satellite imagery to explore changes in the presence of vegetation between the 1995 dry season and the 2014 dry season. Drawing from previous research on shea availability in the Gambella region this research focuses on previously identified areas of identified shea resource. Findings suggest that human development and environmental degradation decrease the presence of indigenous forest may have adverse effects.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/278