Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Natural resources such as land and waterways are often transformed by urban growth. Urban Stream Ecology is a new and growing field because of expanding urbanization and degradation of aquatic environments. Urban streams are facing a phenomenon called Urban Stream Syndrome that comes with many symptoms (Walsh et al. 2005). One of these sources of pollution comes from large-scale urban storm water runoff. Other sources include sewer overflows and waste water treatment plant effluents. Urban streams can also be negatively affected by physical changes made to the stream bed such as reduced access to riparian buffers, which allows more pollutants to enter the stream (Groffman et al. 2003). The effects of these stressors on urban streams include elevated nutrients, elevated contaminants, altered channel morphology, reduced biotic diversity, and increased dominance of tolerant species (Walsh et al. 2005). Ecologists and Limnologists are now studying the relationship of catchment impervious area to pollution inputs in streams. This type of management approach could be used to increase the health of the urban streams. Another method being employed is using advanced drainage designs that are effective in preventing waste water from reaching streams. In the end, urban streams are never going to be as healthy as remote forest streams because of their proximity to pollution and modified catchment. However, Limnologists are looking for ways to mitigate the stressors damaging urban streams.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

220

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Recent Literature on the Causes and Consequences of Urban Stream Sydrome

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Natural resources such as land and waterways are often transformed by urban growth. Urban Stream Ecology is a new and growing field because of expanding urbanization and degradation of aquatic environments. Urban streams are facing a phenomenon called Urban Stream Syndrome that comes with many symptoms (Walsh et al. 2005). One of these sources of pollution comes from large-scale urban storm water runoff. Other sources include sewer overflows and waste water treatment plant effluents. Urban streams can also be negatively affected by physical changes made to the stream bed such as reduced access to riparian buffers, which allows more pollutants to enter the stream (Groffman et al. 2003). The effects of these stressors on urban streams include elevated nutrients, elevated contaminants, altered channel morphology, reduced biotic diversity, and increased dominance of tolerant species (Walsh et al. 2005). Ecologists and Limnologists are now studying the relationship of catchment impervious area to pollution inputs in streams. This type of management approach could be used to increase the health of the urban streams. Another method being employed is using advanced drainage designs that are effective in preventing waste water from reaching streams. In the end, urban streams are never going to be as healthy as remote forest streams because of their proximity to pollution and modified catchment. However, Limnologists are looking for ways to mitigate the stressors damaging urban streams.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/178