Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Over the last decade, observations of sharks in the waters around Cape Cod, Massachusetts (USA) have increased, possibly related to increases in seal populations. However, historical data are needed to put these recent increases into a long-term context. Using newspaper articles, photographs, and fishing tournament records, we compiled historical data on sharks in the waters around Cape Cod from approximately a one hundred year period, from 1830 to 1939. We compared these to trends in modern observations to establish baselines. As well, we document trends in commercial and cultural value of sharks in New England since the early 19th century. Such historical baselines are essential to put recent observations into a long-term context, as well as to begin to understand ecosystem dynamics and the relationship between people and conservation-dependent marine animals over longer time scales.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

606

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Historical Baselines for Large Sharks in Cape Cod, Massachusetts (USA): Putting Recent Observed Increases into Context

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Over the last decade, observations of sharks in the waters around Cape Cod, Massachusetts (USA) have increased, possibly related to increases in seal populations. However, historical data are needed to put these recent increases into a long-term context. Using newspaper articles, photographs, and fishing tournament records, we compiled historical data on sharks in the waters around Cape Cod from approximately a one hundred year period, from 1830 to 1939. We compared these to trends in modern observations to establish baselines. As well, we document trends in commercial and cultural value of sharks in New England since the early 19th century. Such historical baselines are essential to put recent observations into a long-term context, as well as to begin to understand ecosystem dynamics and the relationship between people and conservation-dependent marine animals over longer time scales.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/142