Event Title

Music as Therapy in a Contemporary Society: An Assessment of Music Therapy

Presenter Information

Camille Gross, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 123

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

Music therapy is an emerging form of alternative therapy. There is a great deal of research about the benefits of music therapy, and yet, the discipline continues to lack accessibility, recognition, and legitimacy. There is little to no research about why this is the case. My research analyzes the various reasons why music therapy is not accessible, widely recognized, or considered to be legitimate. I completed extensive research about the history of the discipline. I also studied recent research and experiments completed in the field. Additionally, I observed and completed interviews with music therapists practicing in a variety of settings. My findings suggest that music therapy is under-recognized and lacks accessibility as a form of therapy because it is not seen as a legitimate form of therapy. These findings are important in order to better structure music therapy practices. In order for music therapy to be accessible and recognized, its legitimacy must be promoted to wider audiences.

Faculty Sponsor

Mark Tappan

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Education Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

391

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Music as Therapy in a Contemporary Society: An Assessment of Music Therapy

Diamond 123

Music therapy is an emerging form of alternative therapy. There is a great deal of research about the benefits of music therapy, and yet, the discipline continues to lack accessibility, recognition, and legitimacy. There is little to no research about why this is the case. My research analyzes the various reasons why music therapy is not accessible, widely recognized, or considered to be legitimate. I completed extensive research about the history of the discipline. I also studied recent research and experiments completed in the field. Additionally, I observed and completed interviews with music therapists practicing in a variety of settings. My findings suggest that music therapy is under-recognized and lacks accessibility as a form of therapy because it is not seen as a legitimate form of therapy. These findings are important in order to better structure music therapy practices. In order for music therapy to be accessible and recognized, its legitimacy must be promoted to wider audiences.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/104