Event Title

Biogeographical Characterization and Identification of Phages in Single Amplified Genomes of Epsilonproteobacteria from Deep Sea Vents

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Deep-sea vents are characterized by extreme and dynamic conditions with high temperatures and pressures. In these mineral rich locations, chemolithotropic bacteria are able to survive through inorganic processes such as sulfur oxidation and nitrogen fixation. One objective of this project was to examine the biogeography of ten single amplified genomes of Epsilonproteobacteria from the East Pacific Rise vent by comparing them to metagenomes from various extreme environments. Genomic similarities were found between SAGs and metagenomes from other hydrothermal vents, hypersaline environments, hot springs and sediments. However, the observed patterns were cell-dependent and did not correlate with phylogeny. The second objective was to examine the SAGs for the presence of phages. Using multiple bioinformatics tools, we found one prophage, sharing phage genes with another prophage found in Haliangium ochraceum. Seven genes of known functions were identified on the viral contigs that are not present on any other SAG. It is possible that they were introduced by the prophage through a horizontal gene transfer process called transduction.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Biology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

944

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

Biogeographical Characterization and Identification of Phages in Single Amplified Genomes of Epsilonproteobacteria from Deep Sea Vents

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Deep-sea vents are characterized by extreme and dynamic conditions with high temperatures and pressures. In these mineral rich locations, chemolithotropic bacteria are able to survive through inorganic processes such as sulfur oxidation and nitrogen fixation. One objective of this project was to examine the biogeography of ten single amplified genomes of Epsilonproteobacteria from the East Pacific Rise vent by comparing them to metagenomes from various extreme environments. Genomic similarities were found between SAGs and metagenomes from other hydrothermal vents, hypersaline environments, hot springs and sediments. However, the observed patterns were cell-dependent and did not correlate with phylogeny. The second objective was to examine the SAGs for the presence of phages. Using multiple bioinformatics tools, we found one prophage, sharing phage genes with another prophage found in Haliangium ochraceum. Seven genes of known functions were identified on the viral contigs that are not present on any other SAG. It is possible that they were introduced by the prophage through a horizontal gene transfer process called transduction.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/97