Event Title

Mitigating the Effects of Green Crabs (Carcinus maenus) through Incentives in the Lobster Aquaculture Industry

Location

Diamond 145

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 11:55 AM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

To work towards the mitigation, control, and eventual eradication of green crabs in the Gulf of Maine, we propose using the invasive species as a bait for the local lobster fishery. By using green crab as bait, we can simultaneously help eradicate this destructive invasive species, reduce pressure on local bait fisheries, and provide a cheaper source of bait for Maine lobstermen. Scientists in Nova Scotia have successfully experimented with using green crab as bait and showed that by using a special trap, they could catch approximately 2,000 green crabs/trap/night and sell the bait at a profit. As herring populations continue to decline due to overfishing, green crabs have emerged as a potentially more sustainable and economical alternative. We will also investigate the possible policy implications of a transition from herring to green crab baits and what gear changes, if any, would be necessary for such an endeavor.

Faculty Sponsor

Russ Cole

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1237

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 11:55 AM

Mitigating the Effects of Green Crabs (Carcinus maenus) through Incentives in the Lobster Aquaculture Industry

Diamond 145

To work towards the mitigation, control, and eventual eradication of green crabs in the Gulf of Maine, we propose using the invasive species as a bait for the local lobster fishery. By using green crab as bait, we can simultaneously help eradicate this destructive invasive species, reduce pressure on local bait fisheries, and provide a cheaper source of bait for Maine lobstermen. Scientists in Nova Scotia have successfully experimented with using green crab as bait and showed that by using a special trap, they could catch approximately 2,000 green crabs/trap/night and sell the bait at a profit. As herring populations continue to decline due to overfishing, green crabs have emerged as a potentially more sustainable and economical alternative. We will also investigate the possible policy implications of a transition from herring to green crab baits and what gear changes, if any, would be necessary for such an endeavor.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/72