Event Title

Mild traumatic brain injury in male and female rats: Characterization of a new injury paradigm

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 1:55 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traumatic brain injuries (TBI) contribute to approximately one third of all injury-related deaths in the United States. Of these injuries, approximately 75% are concussion or other forms of mild TBI and evidence is mounting that even these mild forms may have significant adverse effects on cognition and emotional functioning. Many models in both mice and rats have been previously proposed, however these models apply force through either projectiles or blasts to a stationary animal, which do not include the acceleration of the animals head, as seen in common human sports-related injury mechanisms. In addition, a rotational component of the head directly after impact, which is considered to be a key component to the persistent negative effects that follow, is not included in these models. This study sets out to create a novel concussion rat model, which allows for the most accurate simulation of the human concussion injury mechanism. Furthermore, this study will explore the implications of sex differences on the concussion injury symptom and recovery pathology. This research has the potential to open the door to a new way to study concussion and expand our understanding of the injury. It will also complement and add to work already ongoing at Colby on sports-related concussion in humans.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1594

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Apr 30th, 11:00 AM Apr 30th, 1:55 PM

Mild traumatic brain injury in male and female rats: Characterization of a new injury paradigm

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traumatic brain injuries (TBI) contribute to approximately one third of all injury-related deaths in the United States. Of these injuries, approximately 75% are concussion or other forms of mild TBI and evidence is mounting that even these mild forms may have significant adverse effects on cognition and emotional functioning. Many models in both mice and rats have been previously proposed, however these models apply force through either projectiles or blasts to a stationary animal, which do not include the acceleration of the animals head, as seen in common human sports-related injury mechanisms. In addition, a rotational component of the head directly after impact, which is considered to be a key component to the persistent negative effects that follow, is not included in these models. This study sets out to create a novel concussion rat model, which allows for the most accurate simulation of the human concussion injury mechanism. Furthermore, this study will explore the implications of sex differences on the concussion injury symptom and recovery pathology. This research has the potential to open the door to a new way to study concussion and expand our understanding of the injury. It will also complement and add to work already ongoing at Colby on sports-related concussion in humans.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/55