Event Title

Public Health Implications of the Alcohol Management Plans in Three Indigenous Communities in Far North Queensland, Australia

Presenter Information

Carol Walker, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 145

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 11:55 AM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Rooted in European colonization, Indigenous Australians have a considerably poorer modern health status than other Australians. Historically, alcohol has been a substantial issue within Indigenous communities, contributing to a sizable portion of the disease burden, as well as injury and harm. The Queensland government intervened in 2002-03 by implementing alcohol management plans (AMPs), restrictions on alcohol supply within boundaries of the Indigenous communities alongside promises of harm reduction and courses of treatment. In 2008 the restrictions were strengthened with the observance of reduced injury rates. This study, a comprehensive review of the effectiveness and impacts of the AMPs, is the first of its kind to be performed since implementation over a decade ago. This paper examines three of the surveyed communities (Mapoon, Yarrabah, and Napranum), chosen for their differences in carriage restrictions; they are evaluated for the effectiveness of supply reduction as well as any effects that the AMP has had on criminalization. The findings showed that the citizens of all three communities believe that the supply of alcohol has not been reduced since the implementation. The responses on criminalization were very polarized towards an increase, having devastating effects on the social determinants of health, perhaps creating an unhealthier environment than that which existed before the implementation of the protective legislation. Supply reduction alone will not create a positive change within the communities; rather, intensive demand reduction, harm reduction, and treatment programs must accompany it.

Faculty Sponsor

Russ Cole

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1672

Share

COinS
 
Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 11:55 AM

Public Health Implications of the Alcohol Management Plans in Three Indigenous Communities in Far North Queensland, Australia

Diamond 145

Rooted in European colonization, Indigenous Australians have a considerably poorer modern health status than other Australians. Historically, alcohol has been a substantial issue within Indigenous communities, contributing to a sizable portion of the disease burden, as well as injury and harm. The Queensland government intervened in 2002-03 by implementing alcohol management plans (AMPs), restrictions on alcohol supply within boundaries of the Indigenous communities alongside promises of harm reduction and courses of treatment. In 2008 the restrictions were strengthened with the observance of reduced injury rates. This study, a comprehensive review of the effectiveness and impacts of the AMPs, is the first of its kind to be performed since implementation over a decade ago. This paper examines three of the surveyed communities (Mapoon, Yarrabah, and Napranum), chosen for their differences in carriage restrictions; they are evaluated for the effectiveness of supply reduction as well as any effects that the AMP has had on criminalization. The findings showed that the citizens of all three communities believe that the supply of alcohol has not been reduced since the implementation. The responses on criminalization were very polarized towards an increase, having devastating effects on the social determinants of health, perhaps creating an unhealthier environment than that which existed before the implementation of the protective legislation. Supply reduction alone will not create a positive change within the communities; rather, intensive demand reduction, harm reduction, and treatment programs must accompany it.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/432