Event Title

Everyday Care: The Fluctuating and Dynamic Nature of Care in Pediatric Oncology

Presenter Information

Anne Friedrich, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 323

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 11:25 AM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

This project explores the fluctuating and dynamic nature of care in pediatric oncology. By analyzing the various ways in which care manifests through different landscapes of the everyday, gender, affect, and the body, I will show that care does not just have one definition but rather presents in myriad forms in different situations. Care also influences and is influenced by the built environment of the clinic and hospital setting as well as the economic flows of the administration. Lastly, I analyze the ways in which the bodily movements of the medical practitioners become embodied action that leads to concrete experiences of care. Ultimately, I argue that through the movement of bodies, ideas, and emotions, the ideal and abstract notion of care becomes a lived reality through which practitioners make a difference in the lives of their patients.

Faculty Sponsor

Catherine Besteman

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Anthropology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1183

Share

COinS
 
Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 11:25 AM

Everyday Care: The Fluctuating and Dynamic Nature of Care in Pediatric Oncology

Diamond 323

This project explores the fluctuating and dynamic nature of care in pediatric oncology. By analyzing the various ways in which care manifests through different landscapes of the everyday, gender, affect, and the body, I will show that care does not just have one definition but rather presents in myriad forms in different situations. Care also influences and is influenced by the built environment of the clinic and hospital setting as well as the economic flows of the administration. Lastly, I analyze the ways in which the bodily movements of the medical practitioners become embodied action that leads to concrete experiences of care. Ultimately, I argue that through the movement of bodies, ideas, and emotions, the ideal and abstract notion of care becomes a lived reality through which practitioners make a difference in the lives of their patients.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/415