Event Title

How Perfect Are You? Exploring the Link Between Perfectionism, Self-Esteem, and Sensitivity to Feedback Across Multiple Dimensions

Presenter Information

Molly Wylie, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 122

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 11:55 AM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

Both perfectionism and self-esteem have been conceptualized as multi-dimensional characteristicshow one strives for perfection, and how one feels about themselves, can vary by each individual (Crocker & Luhtanen, 2003; Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990). Past research has shown interest in the impact of perfectionism on both overall self-esteem and the contingencies underlying self-esteem; however, the current research goes beyond these previous studies by examining the connection of overall perfectionism and its more specific facets with both global and domain-specific self-esteem. Can the relationship between perfectionism and self-esteem differ depending on the life domain or the perfectionism facet? Does externally-focused perfectionism in a certain area of one's life lead to lower self-esteem than perfectionism that focuses on internal satisfaction? Results highlight that though perfectionism is generally correlated with low overall self-esteem, this relationship can differ depending on life domain and perfectionism facet. For the most part, perfectionistic tendencies in areas of life that require external reinforcement, such as social acceptance, physical attractiveness, or work performance, seem to lead to lower levels of self-esteem. This pattern was also found with facets of perfectionism: whereas externally-focused types of perfectionism related negatively to self-esteem, internally-focused perfectionism did the opposite. Additionally, the relationship between perfectionism in two life domains (competition and social approval) and reactions to both positive and negative feedback will be explored. The present study, then, situates itself at the intersection between one's individual's feeling of self and the mechanisms of perfectionism that underlie this self-evaluation.

Faculty Sponsor

Chris Soto

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1301

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 11:55 AM

How Perfect Are You? Exploring the Link Between Perfectionism, Self-Esteem, and Sensitivity to Feedback Across Multiple Dimensions

Diamond 122

Both perfectionism and self-esteem have been conceptualized as multi-dimensional characteristicshow one strives for perfection, and how one feels about themselves, can vary by each individual (Crocker & Luhtanen, 2003; Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990). Past research has shown interest in the impact of perfectionism on both overall self-esteem and the contingencies underlying self-esteem; however, the current research goes beyond these previous studies by examining the connection of overall perfectionism and its more specific facets with both global and domain-specific self-esteem. Can the relationship between perfectionism and self-esteem differ depending on the life domain or the perfectionism facet? Does externally-focused perfectionism in a certain area of one's life lead to lower self-esteem than perfectionism that focuses on internal satisfaction? Results highlight that though perfectionism is generally correlated with low overall self-esteem, this relationship can differ depending on life domain and perfectionism facet. For the most part, perfectionistic tendencies in areas of life that require external reinforcement, such as social acceptance, physical attractiveness, or work performance, seem to lead to lower levels of self-esteem. This pattern was also found with facets of perfectionism: whereas externally-focused types of perfectionism related negatively to self-esteem, internally-focused perfectionism did the opposite. Additionally, the relationship between perfectionism in two life domains (competition and social approval) and reactions to both positive and negative feedback will be explored. The present study, then, situates itself at the intersection between one's individual's feeling of self and the mechanisms of perfectionism that underlie this self-evaluation.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/361