Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

30-4-2015 3:55 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is a medium-sized predatory cat inhabiting the boreal and montane forests of North America, particularly Canada. However, their range does extend slightly into the subalpine forests of the western US as well as transitional forests in the eastern US. Canada lynx were listed as a federally threatened species in the states at the southern end of their range in 2000, and Maine is currently the only Northeastern state with a resident breeding lynx population, although sightings have been recently reported in New Hampshire and Vermont, which are part of the species historic range. The distribution of Canada lynx is very dependent on populations of snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), their primary prey, as well as early successional coniferous forests and adequate snowfall amounts.

Faculty Sponsor

Philip Nyhus

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1586

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Apr 30th, 2:00 PM Apr 30th, 3:55 PM

Identifying Suitable Canada Lynx Habitat in the Northeast

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is a medium-sized predatory cat inhabiting the boreal and montane forests of North America, particularly Canada. However, their range does extend slightly into the subalpine forests of the western US as well as transitional forests in the eastern US. Canada lynx were listed as a federally threatened species in the states at the southern end of their range in 2000, and Maine is currently the only Northeastern state with a resident breeding lynx population, although sightings have been recently reported in New Hampshire and Vermont, which are part of the species historic range. The distribution of Canada lynx is very dependent on populations of snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), their primary prey, as well as early successional coniferous forests and adequate snowfall amounts.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/34