Event Title

Cell Cycle Dependent Expression of Unknown Cyclins and Cdks in Symbiodinium minutum

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

A critical relationship exists between reef-building corals and the symbiotic algae residing within them. In the nutrient-poor waters of the tropics, the energy provided to corals by these photosynthetic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp.) is necessary for the corals to grow and support a healthy reef ecosystem. In the face of increasing sea temperatures due to global warming, this delicate symbiosis is threatened, leading to coral bleaching. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the endosymbiotic relationship between coral and Symbiodinium spp. It has been found that the doubling times of Symbiodinium are significantly longer in coral than when cultured in isolation. This suggests that the host coral has control over Symbiodinium cell division. Several potential cell cycle dependent genes of interest were identified in the Symbiodinium genome. This project seeks to correlate changes in expression of cell cycle dependent genes with cell cycle phases, in order to better understand the Symbiodinium cell cycle.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Biology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1601

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

Cell Cycle Dependent Expression of Unknown Cyclins and Cdks in Symbiodinium minutum

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

A critical relationship exists between reef-building corals and the symbiotic algae residing within them. In the nutrient-poor waters of the tropics, the energy provided to corals by these photosynthetic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp.) is necessary for the corals to grow and support a healthy reef ecosystem. In the face of increasing sea temperatures due to global warming, this delicate symbiosis is threatened, leading to coral bleaching. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the endosymbiotic relationship between coral and Symbiodinium spp. It has been found that the doubling times of Symbiodinium are significantly longer in coral than when cultured in isolation. This suggests that the host coral has control over Symbiodinium cell division. Several potential cell cycle dependent genes of interest were identified in the Symbiodinium genome. This project seeks to correlate changes in expression of cell cycle dependent genes with cell cycle phases, in order to better understand the Symbiodinium cell cycle.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/3