Event Title

Coffee in the 17th and 18th century Europe

Presenter Information

Clara Nuckols, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 146

Start Date

30-4-2015 2:10 PM

End Date

30-4-2015 3:25 PM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

Coffee, the dark, bitter beverage worshiped by 21st century workaholics and college students, is an invaluable commodity driving the minds and economies of the modern world. Brewed coffee dates back to late 14th century Yemen, where beans were roasted and ground by Arab monks. Its introduction to Europe in the 17th century, alongside tea, chocolate, and tobacco, was revolutionary, as the new drink replaced alcohol as an alternative to water. Europes consumption of coffee and the evolution of the coffeehouse reflect social and cultural changes during that period. This phenomenon is evident in the art of the 17th and 18th centuries. This paper focuses on depictions of coffee-drinking in 17th- and 18th-century art and what they reveal about the periods culture, societal customs, class hierarchies and ideology.

Faculty Sponsor

Veronique Plesch

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Art Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Humanities

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1358

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Apr 30th, 2:10 PM Apr 30th, 3:25 PM

Coffee in the 17th and 18th century Europe

Diamond 146

Coffee, the dark, bitter beverage worshiped by 21st century workaholics and college students, is an invaluable commodity driving the minds and economies of the modern world. Brewed coffee dates back to late 14th century Yemen, where beans were roasted and ground by Arab monks. Its introduction to Europe in the 17th century, alongside tea, chocolate, and tobacco, was revolutionary, as the new drink replaced alcohol as an alternative to water. Europes consumption of coffee and the evolution of the coffeehouse reflect social and cultural changes during that period. This phenomenon is evident in the art of the 17th and 18th centuries. This paper focuses on depictions of coffee-drinking in 17th- and 18th-century art and what they reveal about the periods culture, societal customs, class hierarchies and ideology.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/228