Presenter Information

Andrew Jones, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate and examine Boko Haram, an Islamist terrorist movement based in northeast Nigeria. Although Africas most populous country has witnessed the development of various militant Islamist groups over the years, Boko Haram so far has proved to be the most challenging to combat. In order to understand the full scope of Boko Haram, I will be examining other Islamist terrorist organizations in Africa: specifically Al-Shabaab in Somalia and the presence of al-Qaeda in the Maghreb. My research attempts to answer the question: under what conditions do Islamist groups in Africa pose a threat outside of one state? Based on the findings, I will then attempt to answer what these conditions suggest about Boko Harams potential specifically. The study will conclude with United States policy recommendations, centered on the research and findings in the paper. Before conducting thorough research on Boko Haram and similar organizations, the inefficiency of the Nigerian government is a possible explanation for Boko Harams growth and consolidation of power not only in Nigeria but also in Chad, Niger, and northern Cameroon; the same problem persists in Somalia and the northwest of Africa. The threat of Boko Haram will only dissipate if the Nigeria government implements effectual measures to reduce the persistent poverty plaguing the overall region and builds an educational infrastructure that fosters anti-militant learningthis educational format has the potential to gain the support of local Muslims, who vehemently oppose the radicalization of Islamist terrorist groups. In order to gather my results, I will be consulting various academic books, journals, articles, as well as information from several think tanks and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Faculty Sponsor

Laura Seay

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Government Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1845

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

The Conditions Susceptible to the Rise of Islamic Militant Groups in Africa: What is Boko Haram's Potential for Growth?

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate and examine Boko Haram, an Islamist terrorist movement based in northeast Nigeria. Although Africas most populous country has witnessed the development of various militant Islamist groups over the years, Boko Haram so far has proved to be the most challenging to combat. In order to understand the full scope of Boko Haram, I will be examining other Islamist terrorist organizations in Africa: specifically Al-Shabaab in Somalia and the presence of al-Qaeda in the Maghreb. My research attempts to answer the question: under what conditions do Islamist groups in Africa pose a threat outside of one state? Based on the findings, I will then attempt to answer what these conditions suggest about Boko Harams potential specifically. The study will conclude with United States policy recommendations, centered on the research and findings in the paper. Before conducting thorough research on Boko Haram and similar organizations, the inefficiency of the Nigerian government is a possible explanation for Boko Harams growth and consolidation of power not only in Nigeria but also in Chad, Niger, and northern Cameroon; the same problem persists in Somalia and the northwest of Africa. The threat of Boko Haram will only dissipate if the Nigeria government implements effectual measures to reduce the persistent poverty plaguing the overall region and builds an educational infrastructure that fosters anti-militant learningthis educational format has the potential to gain the support of local Muslims, who vehemently oppose the radicalization of Islamist terrorist groups. In order to gather my results, I will be consulting various academic books, journals, articles, as well as information from several think tanks and the Council on Foreign Relations.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/205