Presenter Information

Tyler Harley, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

I served as the Lighting Designer for the Department of Theater and Dance spring semester production of The Servant of Two Masters. Work encompassed initial conceptual production research through final realized light design objectives in Strider Theater during performances on April 16-18. More specifically, research consisted of textual and visual analysis, computational understanding of the GIO lighting console, stage lighting equipment theory and functionality, color theory, and cueing analysis based on rehearsal outcomes. To translate research into a viable design, the following process elements were generated: Scene-by-Scene Light Score, Light Keys, Light Plot, Channel Hookup, Instrument Schedule, and Virtual Magic Card. As the Lighting Designer, I attended selected rehearsals, tutorials, weekly production meetings, equipment hang and focus sessions with TD 139-Stagecraft students and my assistant Claire Muscat '17, and Pre-Cue Sessions with Faculty Fellow and Director Dave Peterson. The primary focus of my independent study was to more fully understand the role of computation in the rendering of aesthetic light design ideas for theater.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Theater and Dance Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Humanities

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1343

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

The Servant of Two Masters: Lighting Design

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

I served as the Lighting Designer for the Department of Theater and Dance spring semester production of The Servant of Two Masters. Work encompassed initial conceptual production research through final realized light design objectives in Strider Theater during performances on April 16-18. More specifically, research consisted of textual and visual analysis, computational understanding of the GIO lighting console, stage lighting equipment theory and functionality, color theory, and cueing analysis based on rehearsal outcomes. To translate research into a viable design, the following process elements were generated: Scene-by-Scene Light Score, Light Keys, Light Plot, Channel Hookup, Instrument Schedule, and Virtual Magic Card. As the Lighting Designer, I attended selected rehearsals, tutorials, weekly production meetings, equipment hang and focus sessions with TD 139-Stagecraft students and my assistant Claire Muscat '17, and Pre-Cue Sessions with Faculty Fellow and Director Dave Peterson. The primary focus of my independent study was to more fully understand the role of computation in the rendering of aesthetic light design ideas for theater.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/190