Event Title

Applying computational genomics to investigate the dual diagnosis of mental disorders.

Presenter Information

Astrid Moore, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 1:55 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Animal models are an invaluable tool in behavioral research, particularly in the areas regarding the relationship between human addictive and disordered behavior. Hereditary factors constitute a large component of human behavior, and these e↵ects are also mirrored in other species, such as in mice and rats. Further, from genome-wide human behavioral assays we know that genesets can be distinct for a mental disorder at the intersection of two behavioral traits, as in a case of dual diagnosis. In order to discern the extent to which we can map mouse-human and rat- human models for behaviors and psychiatric disorders, among others, web-based applications like Geneweaver provide interactive geneset-comparison tools. The purpose of this study is to investigate how human disordered behavior is reflected in mouse and rat behavior and genetics. Drawing from Jackson Laboratorys Geneweaver database, as well as genetic data from Pamela Maddens Nicotine Addiction Genetics study, my prospective approach is the development of a computational tool for Geneweaver that allows users to visualize the interaction of genetically-linked behavioral traits across species.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1416

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Apr 30th, 11:00 AM Apr 30th, 1:55 PM

Applying computational genomics to investigate the dual diagnosis of mental disorders.

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Animal models are an invaluable tool in behavioral research, particularly in the areas regarding the relationship between human addictive and disordered behavior. Hereditary factors constitute a large component of human behavior, and these e↵ects are also mirrored in other species, such as in mice and rats. Further, from genome-wide human behavioral assays we know that genesets can be distinct for a mental disorder at the intersection of two behavioral traits, as in a case of dual diagnosis. In order to discern the extent to which we can map mouse-human and rat- human models for behaviors and psychiatric disorders, among others, web-based applications like Geneweaver provide interactive geneset-comparison tools. The purpose of this study is to investigate how human disordered behavior is reflected in mouse and rat behavior and genetics. Drawing from Jackson Laboratorys Geneweaver database, as well as genetic data from Pamela Maddens Nicotine Addiction Genetics study, my prospective approach is the development of a computational tool for Geneweaver that allows users to visualize the interaction of genetically-linked behavioral traits across species.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/182