Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

This paper investigates preferences and the willingness to pay for improved cook stoves using a choice experiment administered in Ethiopia. Previous research indicates that traditional cooking methods are harmful to human health as well as the environment, as people need to cut down trees or collect other biomass sources for fuel. However, clean stoves can solve both these environmental and health problems, as well as provide a sustainable method for cooking and heating in developing countries. In this study, we use a choice experiment survey to understand Ethiopian households valuations of different characteristics of stoves, including their durability, fuel reduction, smoke reduction and the amount of time that may be saved as a result of using the new technology. The study also examines demographic factors that possibly affect a household's willingness to pay for the stoves, in an effort to determine what makes these clean technologies desirable in an Ethiopian context. Preliminary results indicate that Ethiopian households hold a preference for improved cook stoves over other fuel sources. In addition to this, households with few children, especially females are willing to pay more for new stoves. The results of this study have implications for global sustainable development initiatives in many parts of the world.

Faculty Sponsor

Sahan T. M. Dissanayake

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Economics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1759

Included in

Economics Commons

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

The Value and Preferences for Improved Cook Stoves: A Choice Experiment in Ethiopia

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

This paper investigates preferences and the willingness to pay for improved cook stoves using a choice experiment administered in Ethiopia. Previous research indicates that traditional cooking methods are harmful to human health as well as the environment, as people need to cut down trees or collect other biomass sources for fuel. However, clean stoves can solve both these environmental and health problems, as well as provide a sustainable method for cooking and heating in developing countries. In this study, we use a choice experiment survey to understand Ethiopian households valuations of different characteristics of stoves, including their durability, fuel reduction, smoke reduction and the amount of time that may be saved as a result of using the new technology. The study also examines demographic factors that possibly affect a household's willingness to pay for the stoves, in an effort to determine what makes these clean technologies desirable in an Ethiopian context. Preliminary results indicate that Ethiopian households hold a preference for improved cook stoves over other fuel sources. In addition to this, households with few children, especially females are willing to pay more for new stoves. The results of this study have implications for global sustainable development initiatives in many parts of the world.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/121