Presenter Information

Xiaojie Chen, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

The alarming decline of the global fishing economy has led to an increased recognition for the need to relieve pressure from the few commercially marketed and heavily overfished stocks, while regaining economic stability for struggling fishing communities. We can improve the longevity and well-being of both the fish stocks and the coastal communities by shifting consumer demand toward seafood that is more sustainably harvested or locally supplied. Currently, however, lack of transparency in the seafood supply chain is a severe impediment to consumer-driven solutions. In response, ecologically aware organizations have begun distributing a variety of eco-labels that help describe the relative sustainability of different seafood choices. However, consumers willingness to pay for a higher level of sustainability and better livelihood of fishermen remains unknown. Therefore, our research will use a choice experiment survey to explore the questions: 1.What is consumers willingness to pay for sustainable seafood? 2.Are consumers more concerned with sustainability of target stocks or the livelihoods of local fishermen? 3.To what degree does official certification matter? Are consumers willing to pay more for seafood that are certified by an organization? This is a choice experiment survey that was distributed to visitors and residents of coastal Maine. The survey identifies consumers willingness to pay for sustainable seafood, and analyzes how preferences differ across consumer demographics . In addition, the survey asks respondent to define sustainability.In addition, the survey asks respondent to define sustainability and describe ambiguous eco-labels in order to evaluate community awareness and determine the amount of detail needed to inform consumers the issue of sustainability.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Economics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1639

Included in

Economics Commons

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

Preferences for Eco-labels in Seafood and Underutilized Fish

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The alarming decline of the global fishing economy has led to an increased recognition for the need to relieve pressure from the few commercially marketed and heavily overfished stocks, while regaining economic stability for struggling fishing communities. We can improve the longevity and well-being of both the fish stocks and the coastal communities by shifting consumer demand toward seafood that is more sustainably harvested or locally supplied. Currently, however, lack of transparency in the seafood supply chain is a severe impediment to consumer-driven solutions. In response, ecologically aware organizations have begun distributing a variety of eco-labels that help describe the relative sustainability of different seafood choices. However, consumers willingness to pay for a higher level of sustainability and better livelihood of fishermen remains unknown. Therefore, our research will use a choice experiment survey to explore the questions: 1.What is consumers willingness to pay for sustainable seafood? 2.Are consumers more concerned with sustainability of target stocks or the livelihoods of local fishermen? 3.To what degree does official certification matter? Are consumers willing to pay more for seafood that are certified by an organization? This is a choice experiment survey that was distributed to visitors and residents of coastal Maine. The survey identifies consumers willingness to pay for sustainable seafood, and analyzes how preferences differ across consumer demographics . In addition, the survey asks respondent to define sustainability.In addition, the survey asks respondent to define sustainability and describe ambiguous eco-labels in order to evaluate community awareness and determine the amount of detail needed to inform consumers the issue of sustainability.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/117