Presenter Information

Margaux LeBlanc, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

30-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2015 10:55 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Throughout the year I have created a graphics pipeline that can render both photorealistic and non-photorealistic images. It all starts with defining what a pixel is and building from there. For instance, an image is a collection of pixels, a color is just three numbers (red, green, and blue values), a line is coloring certain pixels with such a color based on Bresenham's line algorithm and so on. My graphics engine can draw and shade points, lines, polylines, and polygons according to different algorithms. Using these basic shapes I can create photorealistic images of L-systems and non-photorealistic images of paintbrush strokes. Lindenmayer Systems (otherwise known as L-systems) are used to represent snowflakes, trees, and other plants or natural growth patterns. To draw L-systems I came up with an interpreter that can take in a string of characters and draw pictures depending on what the symbols mean. It draws the pictures by adding lines and matrix conversions to a hierarchical modeling system in a 3D viewspace and drawing each element in order. Non-photorealistic images are also important which is why I am going to implement a stroke based drawing tool so that people can sketch cars, scenes, and whatever else they can imagine with my graphics engine. At this point the project is underway and the specifics of my implementation may change. In conclusion, I have created a graphics pipeline from scratch this year that can create a multitude of images specified by the user's desire. Computer Graphics is important not only for artistic reasons but also for architectural modeling, landscape planning, and much more. I hope to tie in my work here into my knowledge of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software to further my engineering knowledge and understanding of such tools.

Faculty Sponsor

Bruce Maxwell

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Computer Science Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

1803

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Apr 30th, 9:00 AM Apr 30th, 10:55 AM

A Look Into Graphics Engines and Non-Photorealistic Rendering

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Throughout the year I have created a graphics pipeline that can render both photorealistic and non-photorealistic images. It all starts with defining what a pixel is and building from there. For instance, an image is a collection of pixels, a color is just three numbers (red, green, and blue values), a line is coloring certain pixels with such a color based on Bresenham's line algorithm and so on. My graphics engine can draw and shade points, lines, polylines, and polygons according to different algorithms. Using these basic shapes I can create photorealistic images of L-systems and non-photorealistic images of paintbrush strokes. Lindenmayer Systems (otherwise known as L-systems) are used to represent snowflakes, trees, and other plants or natural growth patterns. To draw L-systems I came up with an interpreter that can take in a string of characters and draw pictures depending on what the symbols mean. It draws the pictures by adding lines and matrix conversions to a hierarchical modeling system in a 3D viewspace and drawing each element in order. Non-photorealistic images are also important which is why I am going to implement a stroke based drawing tool so that people can sketch cars, scenes, and whatever else they can imagine with my graphics engine. At this point the project is underway and the specifics of my implementation may change. In conclusion, I have created a graphics pipeline from scratch this year that can create a multitude of images specified by the user's desire. Computer Graphics is important not only for artistic reasons but also for architectural modeling, landscape planning, and much more. I hope to tie in my work here into my knowledge of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software to further my engineering knowledge and understanding of such tools.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2015/program/108