Event Title

Chlorite: History, properties, occurrences, and uses

Presenter Information

Cole Stevens, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Chlorite is the name used to identify a group of sheet silicate minerals with similar structure. What makes chlorite so unique is that a wide variety of chemical substitutions are possible within its structure, each producing specimens with slightly different physical and optical properties. Because of the wide range of possible substitutions within chlorites structure, these substitutions can be indicative of the temperature, chemical, and pressure conditions of the environment in which a specific chlorite forms. Chlorites are often found in low-grade metamorphic rock, but are also formed from the alteration and subsequent weathering of clay rich minerals such as pyroxenes, micas, and amphiboles. Places where chlorites are most commonly found on earth are in deep sea vents, as inclusions in massive igneous rocks, and as small constituents of clays. Today, chlorite is most commonly used as a geothermometer. Geothermometers are used to measure the temperature of deep-sea deposits and bore holes deep below earths surface, which aids in telling us the temperature conditions under which the desired area of study developed. Historically, chlorite has also been used for crafting fine jewelry and coins. Overall, chlorite is unique due to its wide range of possible chemical substitutions and important use as a diagnostic mineral.

Faculty Sponsor

Tasha Dunn

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Geology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

436

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Chlorite: History, properties, occurrences, and uses

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Chlorite is the name used to identify a group of sheet silicate minerals with similar structure. What makes chlorite so unique is that a wide variety of chemical substitutions are possible within its structure, each producing specimens with slightly different physical and optical properties. Because of the wide range of possible substitutions within chlorites structure, these substitutions can be indicative of the temperature, chemical, and pressure conditions of the environment in which a specific chlorite forms. Chlorites are often found in low-grade metamorphic rock, but are also formed from the alteration and subsequent weathering of clay rich minerals such as pyroxenes, micas, and amphiboles. Places where chlorites are most commonly found on earth are in deep sea vents, as inclusions in massive igneous rocks, and as small constituents of clays. Today, chlorite is most commonly used as a geothermometer. Geothermometers are used to measure the temperature of deep-sea deposits and bore holes deep below earths surface, which aids in telling us the temperature conditions under which the desired area of study developed. Historically, chlorite has also been used for crafting fine jewelry and coins. Overall, chlorite is unique due to its wide range of possible chemical substitutions and important use as a diagnostic mineral.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/76