Event Title

Epistemologies of the Black Power Movement

Location

Diamond 153

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

For my project, I plan on analyzing how the church meetings, the community schools and research schools during Freedom Summer, and various forms of communication (such as flyers and word of mouth) helped African Americans learn about themselves and their path to internal and external liberation in order to participate in the movement. I plan to analyze whether the process of learning and action happen separately, simultaneously or spontaneously. It is important to study this because it not only helps us understand events and leaders of the Civil Rights movement, but also relates to how we view movements today. The question of my generation (the Millennials) is what will we be known for or if we will be involved in a movement. There is often pressure to mirror tactics and strategies of the Civil Rights Movement. However, it is important to study the education and thinking processes of our predecessors in order to understand that, as Mr. Terrell stated, movements are in response to the time period and needs of the generation at hand.

Faculty Sponsor

Cheryl Townsend Gilkes

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Sociology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

723

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Epistemologies of the Black Power Movement

Diamond 153

For my project, I plan on analyzing how the church meetings, the community schools and research schools during Freedom Summer, and various forms of communication (such as flyers and word of mouth) helped African Americans learn about themselves and their path to internal and external liberation in order to participate in the movement. I plan to analyze whether the process of learning and action happen separately, simultaneously or spontaneously. It is important to study this because it not only helps us understand events and leaders of the Civil Rights movement, but also relates to how we view movements today. The question of my generation (the Millennials) is what will we be known for or if we will be involved in a movement. There is often pressure to mirror tactics and strategies of the Civil Rights Movement. However, it is important to study the education and thinking processes of our predecessors in order to understand that, as Mr. Terrell stated, movements are in response to the time period and needs of the generation at hand.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/72