Event Title

Awareness, Agency, and Alternatives: Opportunities and Challenges for CONAMURI and the Paraguayan Women's Food Sovereignty Movement in an Age of Social Media

Presenter Information

BriAnne Illich, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 343

Start Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

This honors thesis examines the influence and limitations of social media use within the Paraguayan female food sovereignty movement, regarding its role as an alternative news source, a space for self-expression, and a vehicle for engagement and resistance. It focuses specifically on the experiences within CONAMURI, a womens food sovereignty network, whose central headquarters are based in Asuncin. Through literature review, analysis of CONAMURI social media activity, and a month of ethnographic fieldwork, this study sheds light on CONAMURIs campesino context, and the personal experiences, challenges and aspirations, and activities that make up everyday organizational resistance. A thorough analysis of a single food sovereignty network, CONAMURI, functions as a case example of the mobilization and alternative methods that marginalized Paraguayan populations, specifically campesino and indigenous women, might be encouraged to adopt, considering the countrys socioeconomic and political reality. Furthermore, CONAMURI analysis provides a specific and personal illustration of female involvement in Paraguayan activism, giving voice to members experiences. To determine womens perspectives regarding their own mobilization and expression capacity within the public sphere with the aid of social media, this thesis addresses CONAMURI participants perceptions concerning social medias use, impact and potential to facilitate change. Throughout, this thesis argues that social media act as a complementary social movement tool, creating a new outlet for information, expression, agency, and engagement in organized resistances.

Faculty Sponsor

Patrice Franko

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Global Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

21

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May 1st, 12:00 PM May 1st, 1:00 PM

Awareness, Agency, and Alternatives: Opportunities and Challenges for CONAMURI and the Paraguayan Women's Food Sovereignty Movement in an Age of Social Media

Diamond 343

This honors thesis examines the influence and limitations of social media use within the Paraguayan female food sovereignty movement, regarding its role as an alternative news source, a space for self-expression, and a vehicle for engagement and resistance. It focuses specifically on the experiences within CONAMURI, a womens food sovereignty network, whose central headquarters are based in Asuncin. Through literature review, analysis of CONAMURI social media activity, and a month of ethnographic fieldwork, this study sheds light on CONAMURIs campesino context, and the personal experiences, challenges and aspirations, and activities that make up everyday organizational resistance. A thorough analysis of a single food sovereignty network, CONAMURI, functions as a case example of the mobilization and alternative methods that marginalized Paraguayan populations, specifically campesino and indigenous women, might be encouraged to adopt, considering the countrys socioeconomic and political reality. Furthermore, CONAMURI analysis provides a specific and personal illustration of female involvement in Paraguayan activism, giving voice to members experiences. To determine womens perspectives regarding their own mobilization and expression capacity within the public sphere with the aid of social media, this thesis addresses CONAMURI participants perceptions concerning social medias use, impact and potential to facilitate change. Throughout, this thesis argues that social media act as a complementary social movement tool, creating a new outlet for information, expression, agency, and engagement in organized resistances.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/70