Event Title

Linear Algebra in Quantum Computing

Presenter Information

Byoungwook Jang, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 323

Start Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

The immense power of computing has been continually growing, yet we still want more speed and computing capacity. If, as Moores Law states, the number of transistors on a microprocessor continues to double every other year, we will find the circuits on a microprocessor measured on an atomic scale in a couple of decades. Then, we would start to consider quantum computers, which will make use of the power of atoms to perform memory and processing tasks. The mathematics behind quantum computers will be the focus of my presentation. The information contained in qubits (quantum bits), which are analogues of classical bits, can be represented in a matrix form, namely a density matrix. It has been found that a density matrix is positive semi-definite and of trace 1. The operators acting on density matrices need to preserve the trace and positivity so that the resulting output after processing the information is still a density matrix. Therefore, these operators can be thought of as a trace-preserving positive map. In this presentation, the definitions of such maps and properties will be introduced along with the theorems that are related to completely positive maps.

Faculty Sponsor

Leo Livshits

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Mathematics and Statistics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

807

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May 1st, 11:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Linear Algebra in Quantum Computing

Diamond 323

The immense power of computing has been continually growing, yet we still want more speed and computing capacity. If, as Moores Law states, the number of transistors on a microprocessor continues to double every other year, we will find the circuits on a microprocessor measured on an atomic scale in a couple of decades. Then, we would start to consider quantum computers, which will make use of the power of atoms to perform memory and processing tasks. The mathematics behind quantum computers will be the focus of my presentation. The information contained in qubits (quantum bits), which are analogues of classical bits, can be represented in a matrix form, namely a density matrix. It has been found that a density matrix is positive semi-definite and of trace 1. The operators acting on density matrices need to preserve the trace and positivity so that the resulting output after processing the information is still a density matrix. Therefore, these operators can be thought of as a trace-preserving positive map. In this presentation, the definitions of such maps and properties will be introduced along with the theorems that are related to completely positive maps.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/64