Event Title

Don't Give Anything Away

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Gift giving and receiving are two very common experiences that people are faced with at many points in their life. Regardless of nationality, ethnicity, race, or religion, gift giving and receiving are experienced in a variety of cultures in a variety of ways. There are many thoughts and emotions that go into the process of gift giving and receiving. Does the time that the gift is received matter? What happens if the gift is late? Will this change how much the gift is appreciated by the receiver? Will the giver feel guilt because of the latency of the gift? These are the questions that we intend for our research to answer. There has been a lot of research done concerning gift giving, but not a lot of research specifically about giving and receiving late gifts and how guilt and appreciation are affected by the latency of a gift. We want to see if guilt, as a result of giving a tardy gift, moderates the amount the receiver appreciates the gift. Our hypothesis is that if the gift is given late, the giver will feel more guilty and the receiver will appreciate the gift less compared to an on time gift, where the giver wont feel guilty and the receiver will appreciate the gift more.

Faculty Sponsor

Martha Arterberry

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

133

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Don't Give Anything Away

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Gift giving and receiving are two very common experiences that people are faced with at many points in their life. Regardless of nationality, ethnicity, race, or religion, gift giving and receiving are experienced in a variety of cultures in a variety of ways. There are many thoughts and emotions that go into the process of gift giving and receiving. Does the time that the gift is received matter? What happens if the gift is late? Will this change how much the gift is appreciated by the receiver? Will the giver feel guilt because of the latency of the gift? These are the questions that we intend for our research to answer. There has been a lot of research done concerning gift giving, but not a lot of research specifically about giving and receiving late gifts and how guilt and appreciation are affected by the latency of a gift. We want to see if guilt, as a result of giving a tardy gift, moderates the amount the receiver appreciates the gift. Our hypothesis is that if the gift is given late, the giver will feel more guilty and the receiver will appreciate the gift less compared to an on time gift, where the giver wont feel guilty and the receiver will appreciate the gift more.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/59