Presenter Information

Avery Beck, Colby College

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Air pollution has improved in many countries throughout the world, including the United States, within the past few decades, yet adverse health effects caused by exposure to high levels of air pollution remain a problem today. Considered the world’s largest single environmental health risk to date, air pollution was cited as the cause of approximately 1 in 8 total global deaths in 2012. In areas of rapid urbanization, denser road networks and use of motor vehicles are contributing to elevated levels of outdoor air pollution (OAP), and OAP is one of the top ten causes of death in high-income countries. In the U.S., motor vehicles are responsible for producing nearly one-half of smog-forming volatile organic compounds (VOCs), more than half of the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, and approximately half of the nation’s toxic air pollutant emissions, and, when including nonroad vehicles, now account for 75 percent of the nation’s carbon monoxide emissions. Motorized traffic is also one of the most important sources of ambient particulate matter (PM) pollution, which has been linked to increased cardiovascular problems and has been established as an important risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of death worldwide and in the U.S., with approximately one in four individuals dying of cardiovascular disease each. There are multiple risk factors for developing CVDs, yet with personal transportation projected to grow globally in the coming decades, and continuing problems with traffic congestion in the U.S. and internationally, the need for stronger, more comprehensive understandings of how vehicular emissions impact human health is not diminishing. Through a selection of case studies, this poster presents an evaluation of the link between vehicular emissions and incidence of cardiovascular disease.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

689

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Does Exposure to Vehicular Emissions Affect the Incidence of Cardiovascular Problems in Urban Areas?

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Air pollution has improved in many countries throughout the world, including the United States, within the past few decades, yet adverse health effects caused by exposure to high levels of air pollution remain a problem today. Considered the world’s largest single environmental health risk to date, air pollution was cited as the cause of approximately 1 in 8 total global deaths in 2012. In areas of rapid urbanization, denser road networks and use of motor vehicles are contributing to elevated levels of outdoor air pollution (OAP), and OAP is one of the top ten causes of death in high-income countries. In the U.S., motor vehicles are responsible for producing nearly one-half of smog-forming volatile organic compounds (VOCs), more than half of the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, and approximately half of the nation’s toxic air pollutant emissions, and, when including nonroad vehicles, now account for 75 percent of the nation’s carbon monoxide emissions. Motorized traffic is also one of the most important sources of ambient particulate matter (PM) pollution, which has been linked to increased cardiovascular problems and has been established as an important risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of death worldwide and in the U.S., with approximately one in four individuals dying of cardiovascular disease each. There are multiple risk factors for developing CVDs, yet with personal transportation projected to grow globally in the coming decades, and continuing problems with traffic congestion in the U.S. and internationally, the need for stronger, more comprehensive understandings of how vehicular emissions impact human health is not diminishing. Through a selection of case studies, this poster presents an evaluation of the link between vehicular emissions and incidence of cardiovascular disease.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/460