Event Title

Hibachi Restaurants and the Commodification of Cultural Difference

Presenter Information

Tess Perese, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 221

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

This paper will explore the allure of the hibachi experience and its implications. Specifically it will examine the hibachi restaurant Mirakuya in Waterville, Maine. Benihana, the most successful hibachi restaurant in America, will help contextualize the physical space and intention of Mirakuya. A variety of restaurant reviews and analysis of the surrounding Waterville area will also aid in understanding why customers flock to the hibachi experience. Through close ethnographic study of this space, this paper will argue that Mirakuyas contrived Japanese environment attracts and simultaneously distances the Caucasian customer. Furthermore it will show how this relationship not only creates one form of identity, but rather several.

Faculty Sponsor

Ben Lisle

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. American Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

567

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Hibachi Restaurants and the Commodification of Cultural Difference

Diamond 221

This paper will explore the allure of the hibachi experience and its implications. Specifically it will examine the hibachi restaurant Mirakuya in Waterville, Maine. Benihana, the most successful hibachi restaurant in America, will help contextualize the physical space and intention of Mirakuya. A variety of restaurant reviews and analysis of the surrounding Waterville area will also aid in understanding why customers flock to the hibachi experience. Through close ethnographic study of this space, this paper will argue that Mirakuyas contrived Japanese environment attracts and simultaneously distances the Caucasian customer. Furthermore it will show how this relationship not only creates one form of identity, but rather several.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/395