Presenter Information

Shayla Williams, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Lichens are formed by a symbiosis of a fungal mycobiont and a photobiont of either algae or cyanobacteria. Algal photobionts provide the mycobiont with carbon-based energy sources, and cyanobacteria additionally provide fixed Nitrogen (Hinds and Hinds, 2007). The role of the mycobiont in symbiosis is not fully understood. It may be related to providing a protective environment for the algae (Ahmadjian, 1993). Part of the protection may come from secondary metabolites. Lichen secondary metabolites are compounds which accumulate on the exterior of the mycobiont membranes (Hinds and Hinds, 2007). Their role in symbiosis is not fully understood, but they may be integral to protection from biotic stresses. This is evidenced by the higher rates of herbivory and mold infection in the few lichen species which do not produce secondary metabolites (Hawksworth and Hill, 1984). To further understand the role of secondary metabolites in protection from infection, several molds found on the surface of Colby lichens were cultured. They were initially identified by morphotype and then by 18s ribosomal DNA sequencing. Subcultures of the identified molds were treated with extracts containing lichen secondary metabolites from the lichens they were found on. Both qualitative and quantitative effects of the metabolites on the potentially infectious molds were measured.

Faculty Sponsor

Ron Peck

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Biology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

680

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Secondary Metabolites in Symbiosis of Colby Lichens

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Lichens are formed by a symbiosis of a fungal mycobiont and a photobiont of either algae or cyanobacteria. Algal photobionts provide the mycobiont with carbon-based energy sources, and cyanobacteria additionally provide fixed Nitrogen (Hinds and Hinds, 2007). The role of the mycobiont in symbiosis is not fully understood. It may be related to providing a protective environment for the algae (Ahmadjian, 1993). Part of the protection may come from secondary metabolites. Lichen secondary metabolites are compounds which accumulate on the exterior of the mycobiont membranes (Hinds and Hinds, 2007). Their role in symbiosis is not fully understood, but they may be integral to protection from biotic stresses. This is evidenced by the higher rates of herbivory and mold infection in the few lichen species which do not produce secondary metabolites (Hawksworth and Hill, 1984). To further understand the role of secondary metabolites in protection from infection, several molds found on the surface of Colby lichens were cultured. They were initially identified by morphotype and then by 18s ribosomal DNA sequencing. Subcultures of the identified molds were treated with extracts containing lichen secondary metabolites from the lichens they were found on. Both qualitative and quantitative effects of the metabolites on the potentially infectious molds were measured.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/385