Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

As part of a Maine EPSCoR grant focusing on sustainability in the Belgrade Lakes watershed of central Maine, current research consists of collecting bottom sediment samples from Great Pond. Samples were analyzed to create a sediment map of the lake basin in regards to depth, grain-size distribution, organic content (%C), C:N ratios and phosphorus concentration. Results will aid in the understanding of the glacial formation of the lake, distribution of sediment within, and human impact on the lake. Additionally, knowing the distribution of phosphorus within the sediments may allow development of a strategy to avoid accelerated eutrophication. This research will add to the geologic knowledge base of lake sedimentation and chemistry and will provide data that can be used by local conservation groups for community education and advocacy for best sustainability practices for lake management.

Faculty Sponsor

Herb Wilson

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Geology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

877

Included in

Geology Commons

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

From the Depths of Great Pond (Maine): Anthropogenic and Natural Influences on Bottom Sediments and the Implications for Local Sustainability

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

As part of a Maine EPSCoR grant focusing on sustainability in the Belgrade Lakes watershed of central Maine, current research consists of collecting bottom sediment samples from Great Pond. Samples were analyzed to create a sediment map of the lake basin in regards to depth, grain-size distribution, organic content (%C), C:N ratios and phosphorus concentration. Results will aid in the understanding of the glacial formation of the lake, distribution of sediment within, and human impact on the lake. Additionally, knowing the distribution of phosphorus within the sediments may allow development of a strategy to avoid accelerated eutrophication. This research will add to the geologic knowledge base of lake sedimentation and chemistry and will provide data that can be used by local conservation groups for community education and advocacy for best sustainability practices for lake management.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/369