Event Title

A Golden Age Free from Crime, Disease, Filth, and Poverty': Muckrakers and Public Health Reform in the Progressive Era

Presenter Information

Sarah Barrese, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Written and photographed accounts of social health travesties incensed an American public eager to fight for their perceived health rights during the Progressive Era. This study focuses on three social reformers and their respective works, in particular. Jacob Riis 1890 How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York, Samuel Hopkins Adams 1905 The Great American Fraud series, and Upton Sinclairs 1906 The Jungle each contributed to a push for greater attention and regulation in public health issues. Usually classified as muckrakers, these men uncovered medical truths and revealed the ills of dangerous food, drug, and housing production industries. Coined by President Theodore Roosevelt, the term muckraker refers to investigative journalists who use their work to expose corrupt practices and initiate social reform, in this case concerning public health regulation. Through emerging technologies and increasing understanding of bacterial diseases, investigative journalism contributed to significant public health reforms during the Progressive Era in the United States.

Faculty Sponsor

Paul Josephson

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Science, Technology and Society Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

627

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

A Golden Age Free from Crime, Disease, Filth, and Poverty': Muckrakers and Public Health Reform in the Progressive Era

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Written and photographed accounts of social health travesties incensed an American public eager to fight for their perceived health rights during the Progressive Era. This study focuses on three social reformers and their respective works, in particular. Jacob Riis 1890 How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York, Samuel Hopkins Adams 1905 The Great American Fraud series, and Upton Sinclairs 1906 The Jungle each contributed to a push for greater attention and regulation in public health issues. Usually classified as muckrakers, these men uncovered medical truths and revealed the ills of dangerous food, drug, and housing production industries. Coined by President Theodore Roosevelt, the term muckraker refers to investigative journalists who use their work to expose corrupt practices and initiate social reform, in this case concerning public health regulation. Through emerging technologies and increasing understanding of bacterial diseases, investigative journalism contributed to significant public health reforms during the Progressive Era in the United States.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/358