Presenter Information

Stefanie Lai, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

At the end of a computers life cycle, its final destination is often unknown to the average consumer. Consumers unwittingly contribute to electronic waste (e-waste) pollution, even if they attempt to recycle old monitors, televisions, gaming consoles etc, in an environmentally friendly way. In recent years e-waste has become an emerging global issue as electronics usage increases and questionable methods of disposal are exposed. Approximately, 70% of the worlds e-waste is shipped back to China, where it is often disposed of using hazardous methods. These include open-flame burning and acid digestion directly into the soil causing a widespread presence of harmful compounds in the biota that inhabit the regions surrounding these disposal sites. Funded by the National Science Foundation, this REU examined remediation techniques, both biological and abiotic as possible strategies to mitigate this ever-growing problem.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

37

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

BioTransformation of Halogenated Flame Retardants

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

At the end of a computers life cycle, its final destination is often unknown to the average consumer. Consumers unwittingly contribute to electronic waste (e-waste) pollution, even if they attempt to recycle old monitors, televisions, gaming consoles etc, in an environmentally friendly way. In recent years e-waste has become an emerging global issue as electronics usage increases and questionable methods of disposal are exposed. Approximately, 70% of the worlds e-waste is shipped back to China, where it is often disposed of using hazardous methods. These include open-flame burning and acid digestion directly into the soil causing a widespread presence of harmful compounds in the biota that inhabit the regions surrounding these disposal sites. Funded by the National Science Foundation, this REU examined remediation techniques, both biological and abiotic as possible strategies to mitigate this ever-growing problem.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/355