Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

The 2008 financial crisis impacted almost everyone in the world, particularly US households that have lost on average in income. A common problem that currently plagues the minds of college students is the cost of education. Households are still recovering from the monetary impacts of the financial crisis. We recognize that college grants and scholarships are important to students who wish to pursue higher education, and so do the colleges. Majority of the colleges have carefully designed institutional financial aid options, which usually consist of institutional grants, scholarships, work studies, and loans. Around 75% of full-time undergraduate students in the US receive financial aid from colleges. The colleges designate institutional financial aid from their endowment funds. The colleges raise funds primarily in three ways: by collecting contributions/donations, by applying to grants, and by investing into financial instruments. With the increasing financial burden of the US household how have colleges adapted to the changes in the economy and the increasing need for more financial aid? The goal of this project is to trace the impacts of the following factors on the amount of grants and scholarships colleges allocated during 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011: economic conditions (GDP), college expenses (administrative and other costs), and investment returns. Data for this project will come from Form 990 of 70 randomly selected non-profit colleges in the US.

Faculty Sponsor

Dan LaFave

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Economics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

869

Included in

Economics Commons

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Financial Crisis and Its Impact on Institutional College Financial Aid

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The 2008 financial crisis impacted almost everyone in the world, particularly US households that have lost on average in income. A common problem that currently plagues the minds of college students is the cost of education. Households are still recovering from the monetary impacts of the financial crisis. We recognize that college grants and scholarships are important to students who wish to pursue higher education, and so do the colleges. Majority of the colleges have carefully designed institutional financial aid options, which usually consist of institutional grants, scholarships, work studies, and loans. Around 75% of full-time undergraduate students in the US receive financial aid from colleges. The colleges designate institutional financial aid from their endowment funds. The colleges raise funds primarily in three ways: by collecting contributions/donations, by applying to grants, and by investing into financial instruments. With the increasing financial burden of the US household how have colleges adapted to the changes in the economy and the increasing need for more financial aid? The goal of this project is to trace the impacts of the following factors on the amount of grants and scholarships colleges allocated during 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011: economic conditions (GDP), college expenses (administrative and other costs), and investment returns. Data for this project will come from Form 990 of 70 randomly selected non-profit colleges in the US.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/354