Event Title

Modeling the Effects of Polar Ice Cap Melt.

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Rising global temperatures are bound to adversely affect coastal cities around the globe in the next century, to what extent is still unknown. In particular, Florida is home to millions along its coastal areas, which lie just above sea level. We researched historical temperatures and paired this data with the resulting polar ice cap melt to model future changes in sea level. Our analysis predicts that sea levels will trend upward in the next 50 years but not enough to singlehandedly drown Floridas coastal cities. However, higher sea levels alongside more frequent severe storms could lead to irreversible flooding. We conclude that global warming will make Floridas coast increasingly susceptible to erosion and permanent flooding over the course of the next century.

Faculty Sponsor

Lu Lu

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Mathematics and Statistics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

669

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 2:00 PM

Modeling the Effects of Polar Ice Cap Melt.

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Rising global temperatures are bound to adversely affect coastal cities around the globe in the next century, to what extent is still unknown. In particular, Florida is home to millions along its coastal areas, which lie just above sea level. We researched historical temperatures and paired this data with the resulting polar ice cap melt to model future changes in sea level. Our analysis predicts that sea levels will trend upward in the next 50 years but not enough to singlehandedly drown Floridas coastal cities. However, higher sea levels alongside more frequent severe storms could lead to irreversible flooding. We conclude that global warming will make Floridas coast increasingly susceptible to erosion and permanent flooding over the course of the next century.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/342