Event Title

Illicit Prescription Stimulant Use at Colby College

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Prescription stimulants, such as Adderall, Ritalin, Vyvanse, are used to treat the symptoms of attention disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD). These drugs help regulate behavior and control symptoms of poor focus, impulsivity, and hyperactivity by increasing dopamine and norepinephrine levels in the brain. In recent years, non-prescription use of these stimulants in order to improve concentration has become prevalent on college campuses. We administered voluntary surveys addressing illicit stimulant use and other variables to Colby College Students. Our primary question was Does the illicit use of prescription stimulants correlate with higher GPA? We also aim to examine the prevalence of study drug use at Colby. Finally, is the illicit use of prescription stimulants associated with another variable, such as academic major, gender, athletic participation, or parents education level? We found that between 12% and 32% of Colby students use illicit stimulants for academic purposes. The data suggest that non-users have higher GPAs than users of illicit stimulants, which may imply that stimulant use does not confer an academic advantage. None of the variables listed above were identified as significant risk factors for stimulant use.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Mathematics and Statistics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

479

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 2:00 PM

Illicit Prescription Stimulant Use at Colby College

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Prescription stimulants, such as Adderall, Ritalin, Vyvanse, are used to treat the symptoms of attention disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD). These drugs help regulate behavior and control symptoms of poor focus, impulsivity, and hyperactivity by increasing dopamine and norepinephrine levels in the brain. In recent years, non-prescription use of these stimulants in order to improve concentration has become prevalent on college campuses. We administered voluntary surveys addressing illicit stimulant use and other variables to Colby College Students. Our primary question was Does the illicit use of prescription stimulants correlate with higher GPA? We also aim to examine the prevalence of study drug use at Colby. Finally, is the illicit use of prescription stimulants associated with another variable, such as academic major, gender, athletic participation, or parents education level? We found that between 12% and 32% of Colby students use illicit stimulants for academic purposes. The data suggest that non-users have higher GPAs than users of illicit stimulants, which may imply that stimulant use does not confer an academic advantage. None of the variables listed above were identified as significant risk factors for stimulant use.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/320