Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

In this paper we seek to explore the relationship between methamphetamine usage and violent crime in the United States. As a drug produced from readily available ingredients, methamphetamines presence is felt across the country, and it is often anecdotally linked with both violent crime and property crime. Through the analysis of state-level data, we hope to determine whether or not methamphetamine availability is a useful predictor of crime. Methamphetamine usage is difficult to measure, as its production and consumption is not reliably tracked by virtue of its illicit nature. However, we can approximate methamphetamine usage by state using other metrics, such as meth-related arrests. Many states have adopted policies aimed at reducing methamphetamine production by restricting access to pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient. States with Schedule V classification of pseudoephedrine require photo identification and limit the amount available to be purchased at one time, while Oregon, the only state with Schedule III classification, requires a prescription. By comparing states with such policies to states without these restrictions, we should be able to determine if there exists a relationship between meth usage and crime, controlling for other differences. We anticipate finding a positive correlation.

Faculty Sponsor

Dan LaFave

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Economics Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

775

Included in

Economics Commons

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Pseudoephedrine Scheduling and Violent Crime

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

In this paper we seek to explore the relationship between methamphetamine usage and violent crime in the United States. As a drug produced from readily available ingredients, methamphetamines presence is felt across the country, and it is often anecdotally linked with both violent crime and property crime. Through the analysis of state-level data, we hope to determine whether or not methamphetamine availability is a useful predictor of crime. Methamphetamine usage is difficult to measure, as its production and consumption is not reliably tracked by virtue of its illicit nature. However, we can approximate methamphetamine usage by state using other metrics, such as meth-related arrests. Many states have adopted policies aimed at reducing methamphetamine production by restricting access to pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient. States with Schedule V classification of pseudoephedrine require photo identification and limit the amount available to be purchased at one time, while Oregon, the only state with Schedule III classification, requires a prescription. By comparing states with such policies to states without these restrictions, we should be able to determine if there exists a relationship between meth usage and crime, controlling for other differences. We anticipate finding a positive correlation.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/32