Event Title

Deriving dog from wolf and fox, or collar and bone? False memory in categorical and associative word lists

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Studying lists of categorically and associatively related words, such as garage, truck, and drive results in false memory for critical lures (i.e., car). However, in prior studies (e.g., Knott et al., 2012), associatively related lists included both associates (e.g., drive and garage) and categorically related items (e.g., truck). Thus, these studies cannot isolate the effects of association from those of feature overlap or semantic similarity, a critical question for understanding the nature of the underlying processes. In the present study, participants studied carefully matched lists of categorically or associatively related items. Immediate free recall and final recognition tests were administered. Categorically related list items were recalled and recognized more than associatively related list items. Importantly, critical lures from categorical lists were also falsely recognized more than those from associative lists, suggesting that, when associative strength is matched, shared features or similarity contribute to false memory above and beyond associative strength.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

770

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Deriving dog from wolf and fox, or collar and bone? False memory in categorical and associative word lists

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Studying lists of categorically and associatively related words, such as garage, truck, and drive results in false memory for critical lures (i.e., car). However, in prior studies (e.g., Knott et al., 2012), associatively related lists included both associates (e.g., drive and garage) and categorically related items (e.g., truck). Thus, these studies cannot isolate the effects of association from those of feature overlap or semantic similarity, a critical question for understanding the nature of the underlying processes. In the present study, participants studied carefully matched lists of categorically or associatively related items. Immediate free recall and final recognition tests were administered. Categorically related list items were recalled and recognized more than associatively related list items. Importantly, critical lures from categorical lists were also falsely recognized more than those from associative lists, suggesting that, when associative strength is matched, shared features or similarity contribute to false memory above and beyond associative strength.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/314