Event Title

Jewish Postmodern Choreographers: Religion and Identity through Dance

Presenter Information

Madeline Kurtz, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 343

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 4:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Through my research, I examine the choreographic processes and works of three leading American Jewish choreographers: Liz Lerman, David Dorfman, and Vic Marks. While Lerman and Dorfman tend to use their religion as either a jumping off point for their creative research, or as the driving force behind their work, Marks acknowledges her stance as a secular Jew who is culturally Jewish and, while her religion is certainly part of her identity, it is not the primary focus of her work. Perhaps the most interesting commonality between these choreographers is their connection with the Jewish philosophy of Tikkun Olam, repairing the world. Both Marks and Lerman make community-based work to give back, and Dorfman often references Tikkun Olam by making dances that are rooted in Jewish ideas but are also relatable to other minorities. These choreographers, while different in research foci and aesthetics, have shared sentiments surrounding their processes, such as a strong gravitation towards community outreach. Many of these commonalities stem from their individual understandings of their religious identities as Jews, whether they self-identify as culturally Jewish, religiously Jewish or both.

Faculty Sponsor

Carleen Mandolfo

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Religious Studies Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Humanities

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

59

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 4:00 PM

Jewish Postmodern Choreographers: Religion and Identity through Dance

Diamond 343

Through my research, I examine the choreographic processes and works of three leading American Jewish choreographers: Liz Lerman, David Dorfman, and Vic Marks. While Lerman and Dorfman tend to use their religion as either a jumping off point for their creative research, or as the driving force behind their work, Marks acknowledges her stance as a secular Jew who is culturally Jewish and, while her religion is certainly part of her identity, it is not the primary focus of her work. Perhaps the most interesting commonality between these choreographers is their connection with the Jewish philosophy of Tikkun Olam, repairing the world. Both Marks and Lerman make community-based work to give back, and Dorfman often references Tikkun Olam by making dances that are rooted in Jewish ideas but are also relatable to other minorities. These choreographers, while different in research foci and aesthetics, have shared sentiments surrounding their processes, such as a strong gravitation towards community outreach. Many of these commonalities stem from their individual understandings of their religious identities as Jews, whether they self-identify as culturally Jewish, religiously Jewish or both.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/312