Event Title

Music and Spoken Language

Location

Diamond 122

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

Project Type

Presentation

Description

Music plays a fascinating role in speech perception and production. Studies have found that it offers benefits to both healthy and disordered populations, improving subcortical as well as cortical processing. Healthy populations tend to see an improvement in the subcortical encoding of speech - which is essentially registering that a speech sound is occurring and determining its frequency - after receiving musical training. The most dramatic effects can be seen in disordered populations, where music can be used to treat speech-related conditions like aphasia, and help these individuals to recover their ability to communicate with the world. This presentation will explore the way that music interacts with the human language system, and particularly how and why it is such an important tool for treating aphasia.

Faculty Sponsor

Martha Arterberry

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

780

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:30 AM

Music and Spoken Language

Diamond 122

Music plays a fascinating role in speech perception and production. Studies have found that it offers benefits to both healthy and disordered populations, improving subcortical as well as cortical processing. Healthy populations tend to see an improvement in the subcortical encoding of speech - which is essentially registering that a speech sound is occurring and determining its frequency - after receiving musical training. The most dramatic effects can be seen in disordered populations, where music can be used to treat speech-related conditions like aphasia, and help these individuals to recover their ability to communicate with the world. This presentation will explore the way that music interacts with the human language system, and particularly how and why it is such an important tool for treating aphasia.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/291