Event Title

Eyewitness Accuracy: Stereotypical Cross-race Group Crimes and Effects on Eyewitness Identification

Presenter Information

Lynna Lei, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

The proposed study will examine the interaction between the number of assailants and crime stereotypicality and their effects on memory using an online questionnaire. To examine whether the race of the perpetrator affects eyewitness accuracy, photographs of white and black men will be presented. In addition, the extent to which a crime is stereotypically black or white, e.g. hate crime vs. gang-related crime will be tested. Because most studies on the cross-race effect have only examined memory for viewing individual faces, even though many situations involve witnessing more than one perpetrator, the proposed study will further investigate memory for individuals in small groups. In the same-race cases, where participants view perpetrators of the same race, I expect that there will be no significant differences between any of the conditions. In the cross-race cases, where participants view perpetrators of a different race, I expect that there will be a significant difference in accuracy in both the stereotypical crime and group conditions, specifically due to increased false alarms. When comparing same-race and cross-race cases, I expect that in all conditions, accuracy will be significantly higher in the same-race condition.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

636

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Eyewitness Accuracy: Stereotypical Cross-race Group Crimes and Effects on Eyewitness Identification

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The proposed study will examine the interaction between the number of assailants and crime stereotypicality and their effects on memory using an online questionnaire. To examine whether the race of the perpetrator affects eyewitness accuracy, photographs of white and black men will be presented. In addition, the extent to which a crime is stereotypically black or white, e.g. hate crime vs. gang-related crime will be tested. Because most studies on the cross-race effect have only examined memory for viewing individual faces, even though many situations involve witnessing more than one perpetrator, the proposed study will further investigate memory for individuals in small groups. In the same-race cases, where participants view perpetrators of the same race, I expect that there will be no significant differences between any of the conditions. In the cross-race cases, where participants view perpetrators of a different race, I expect that there will be a significant difference in accuracy in both the stereotypical crime and group conditions, specifically due to increased false alarms. When comparing same-race and cross-race cases, I expect that in all conditions, accuracy will be significantly higher in the same-race condition.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/267