Event Title

Women and Gender in East Asia--Lotus Shoes: Foot Binding as a Gendered Practice in China

Presenter Information

Katie Allan, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 242

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:50 AM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

I will be giving a presentation on work from the second half of the semester on foot binding in China, particularly in the Qing dynasty. I will analyze the gendered impact this practice had on women, as well as the causal factors for the beginning of the tradition around the 9th century, as well as its continuation in popular culture until the early 1900s. My research will encompass a history of the practice, as well as the contextual clues that help scholars and historians to understand the lives of women (and men, through their interactions with bound feet and their writings about the practice) in China while this practice was popular. I will also focus on how current Western perceptions tie in to the discourse surrounding this tradition and how that leads to bias in both my research and other accounts of the practice.

Faculty Sponsor

Elizabeth LaCouture

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. History Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

466

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:50 AM

Women and Gender in East Asia--Lotus Shoes: Foot Binding as a Gendered Practice in China

Diamond 242

I will be giving a presentation on work from the second half of the semester on foot binding in China, particularly in the Qing dynasty. I will analyze the gendered impact this practice had on women, as well as the causal factors for the beginning of the tradition around the 9th century, as well as its continuation in popular culture until the early 1900s. My research will encompass a history of the practice, as well as the contextual clues that help scholars and historians to understand the lives of women (and men, through their interactions with bound feet and their writings about the practice) in China while this practice was popular. I will also focus on how current Western perceptions tie in to the discourse surrounding this tradition and how that leads to bias in both my research and other accounts of the practice.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/247