Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a widespread condition throughout honeybee populations across the globe, resulting in either partial or total failure of Apis mellifera hives including death and/or hive abandonment. Many factors, either independently or concurrently, contribute to CCD, making it difficult to establish a singular cause of collapse. Research was performed to evaluate several prevalent causes and establish a singular most pervasive one based on four major criteria. These included: potential to expand, frequency of threat, geographic range, effectiveness of treatment. This study tested the hypothesis that a singular predominant cause could be identified based on the results of the conducted evaluation. Six case studies were evaluated, representing the six major contributors to CCD, including: the Varroa mite, neoniconitoids, Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV), parasites, imidacloprid, and insecticide boosters. Because of the synergistic effects of these contributors, and the high rates of mortality for unprotected hives, a management system preventing CCD must be very situation-specific and as minimalistic as possible. The most aggressive contributors to CCD are the Varroa mite and Parasites (specifically Nosema apis and Apocephalus borealis), and prevention must be focused on these, likely through physiological impairment of the mite and development of anti-parasite treatments.

Faculty Sponsor

Russ Cole

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Environmental Studies Program

CLAS Field of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

438

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Colony Collapse Disorder: An Assessment of Causes and Their Pervasiveness

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a widespread condition throughout honeybee populations across the globe, resulting in either partial or total failure of Apis mellifera hives including death and/or hive abandonment. Many factors, either independently or concurrently, contribute to CCD, making it difficult to establish a singular cause of collapse. Research was performed to evaluate several prevalent causes and establish a singular most pervasive one based on four major criteria. These included: potential to expand, frequency of threat, geographic range, effectiveness of treatment. This study tested the hypothesis that a singular predominant cause could be identified based on the results of the conducted evaluation. Six case studies were evaluated, representing the six major contributors to CCD, including: the Varroa mite, neoniconitoids, Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV), parasites, imidacloprid, and insecticide boosters. Because of the synergistic effects of these contributors, and the high rates of mortality for unprotected hives, a management system preventing CCD must be very situation-specific and as minimalistic as possible. The most aggressive contributors to CCD are the Varroa mite and Parasites (specifically Nosema apis and Apocephalus borealis), and prevention must be focused on these, likely through physiological impairment of the mite and development of anti-parasite treatments.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/24