Presenter Information

Kiernan Somers, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

Tensions between the right to self-determination and existing states have caused many conflicts around the globe. Resource rich regions such as Katanga, Biafra, South Sudan, East Timor, Cabinda, and Aceh all had to go through the international community to gain statehood and were either granted or declined the right to self-determination. Secessionist movements frequently challenge existing state borderlines; however, few reach the ultimate goal of statehood. Secession attempts in resource rich regions, whether carried out by unorganized rebels, or a fully functioning autonomous government, are dependent on the international community for success. Through textual analyses of academic journals, monographs, and intergovernmental organization reports, this paper seeks to demonstrate the conditions under which the international community grants diplomatic recognition to secessionist movements. Factoring in government stability, economic viability, the past history of a region, and industrial relationships, the international community plays a large role in determining the path to statehood before granting statehood and diplomatic recognition. Through research conducted it was discovered that the stability of a regional government, including the support for the west; the presence of resources to provide for a working economy; the presence of resources to provide for a working economy; the presence of conflict causing human rights violations and or genocide; and the strength of industrial relationships between extractive companies and home governments are the most important factors considered by the international community.

Faculty Sponsor

Laura Seay

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Government Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

170

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

It’s Our Money and We Want it Now:Secession in Resource Rich Countries and the Role of the International Community

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Tensions between the right to self-determination and existing states have caused many conflicts around the globe. Resource rich regions such as Katanga, Biafra, South Sudan, East Timor, Cabinda, and Aceh all had to go through the international community to gain statehood and were either granted or declined the right to self-determination. Secessionist movements frequently challenge existing state borderlines; however, few reach the ultimate goal of statehood. Secession attempts in resource rich regions, whether carried out by unorganized rebels, or a fully functioning autonomous government, are dependent on the international community for success. Through textual analyses of academic journals, monographs, and intergovernmental organization reports, this paper seeks to demonstrate the conditions under which the international community grants diplomatic recognition to secessionist movements. Factoring in government stability, economic viability, the past history of a region, and industrial relationships, the international community plays a large role in determining the path to statehood before granting statehood and diplomatic recognition. Through research conducted it was discovered that the stability of a regional government, including the support for the west; the presence of resources to provide for a working economy; the presence of resources to provide for a working economy; the presence of conflict causing human rights violations and or genocide; and the strength of industrial relationships between extractive companies and home governments are the most important factors considered by the international community.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/234