Event Title

Influence of the Sea Surface Microlayer on Ozone Deposition

Presenter Information

Kathryn Moore, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Diamond 145

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 4:00 PM

Project Type

Presentation- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Ozone deposition to the ocean surface represents a significant loss from the atmosphere with current best estimates, based on chemistry transport model analyses, being about one third of the global annual O3 deposition of 6001000 Tg O3 yr-1. Such deposition likely represents the net flux to the physical ocean surface, chemical interactions in the presence or absence of a surface microlayer, and bidirectional reactions between O3 and reactive iodine dependent on the environmental light regime. A laboratory-based experimental approach is used to further explore controls on the rates of O3 deposition to seawater. We examine the influence of iodide concentration and microlayer composition on O3 deposition velocity as a means to assess the role surface-active organics play in mediating O3 deposition rates. Experimental results are used to discern whether soluble and insoluble model surfactants and components of natural microlayers act to physically and/or chemically enhance or suppress O3 deposition.

Faculty Sponsor

Julie Millard

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Chemistry Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

197

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 4:00 PM

Influence of the Sea Surface Microlayer on Ozone Deposition

Diamond 145

Ozone deposition to the ocean surface represents a significant loss from the atmosphere with current best estimates, based on chemistry transport model analyses, being about one third of the global annual O3 deposition of 6001000 Tg O3 yr-1. Such deposition likely represents the net flux to the physical ocean surface, chemical interactions in the presence or absence of a surface microlayer, and bidirectional reactions between O3 and reactive iodine dependent on the environmental light regime. A laboratory-based experimental approach is used to further explore controls on the rates of O3 deposition to seawater. We examine the influence of iodide concentration and microlayer composition on O3 deposition velocity as a means to assess the role surface-active organics play in mediating O3 deposition rates. Experimental results are used to discern whether soluble and insoluble model surfactants and components of natural microlayers act to physically and/or chemically enhance or suppress O3 deposition.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/219