Event Title

Bioinformatic Analyses of Epsilonproteobacteria and the Potential Interactions with Zetaproteobacteria

Presenter Information

Audrey Lyman, Colby CollegeFollow

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 11:00 AM

Project Type

Poster- Restricted to Campus Access

Description

Despite contrasting energy-yielding oxidation processes, epsilon- and zeta-Proteobacteria often co-occur in microbial iron mats. Epsilonproteobacteria, believed to primarily oxidize sulfur, are better understood but generally less prevalent in iron mats than the Zetaproteobacteria, which are believed to oxidize iron for growth. The main objective of this research was to discover potential interactions between zeta- and epsilon-proteobacteria at the Loihi Seamount. Single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Loihi were analyzed for evidence of horizontal gene transfer, a process by which sections of genomes (genomic islands (GIs)) are transferred between bacteria. Thirty-three GIs were found in five Epsilonproteobacteria SAGs, and one hundred and eighty-nine GIs were found in nineteen Zetaproteobacteria SAGs. The GIs were compared by BLAST against all proteins in the opposing group to determine whether a GI was transferred between groups or came from another source. There was evidence that transfer may occur between the two groups, and the presence of an almost complete sulfur-transfer (SUF system) GI in the Zetaproteobacteria indicates that these bacteria have taken up genes to sustain energy by oxidizing reduced sulfur when little iron is available.

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Biology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Natural Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

195

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 11:00 AM

Bioinformatic Analyses of Epsilonproteobacteria and the Potential Interactions with Zetaproteobacteria

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Despite contrasting energy-yielding oxidation processes, epsilon- and zeta-Proteobacteria often co-occur in microbial iron mats. Epsilonproteobacteria, believed to primarily oxidize sulfur, are better understood but generally less prevalent in iron mats than the Zetaproteobacteria, which are believed to oxidize iron for growth. The main objective of this research was to discover potential interactions between zeta- and epsilon-proteobacteria at the Loihi Seamount. Single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Loihi were analyzed for evidence of horizontal gene transfer, a process by which sections of genomes (genomic islands (GIs)) are transferred between bacteria. Thirty-three GIs were found in five Epsilonproteobacteria SAGs, and one hundred and eighty-nine GIs were found in nineteen Zetaproteobacteria SAGs. The GIs were compared by BLAST against all proteins in the opposing group to determine whether a GI was transferred between groups or came from another source. There was evidence that transfer may occur between the two groups, and the presence of an almost complete sulfur-transfer (SUF system) GI in the Zetaproteobacteria indicates that these bacteria have taken up genes to sustain energy by oxidizing reduced sulfur when little iron is available.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/20