Event Title

How Old is Your Personality? An Exploration of How Big Five Traits Mediate Time Perspective, Social Goals, and Partner Preferences in College Students.

Location

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 2:00 PM

Project Type

Poster

Description

The current study will explore if views on time and social motivation can be explained by personality traits. Because there tend to be significant differences in the Big Five domains as a function of age, the proposed research will investigate whether a college-aged student with Big Five scores consistent with those typically found in older adults (high Conscientiousness, high Agreeableness, low Extraversion, low Neuroticism, and low Openness) would be more likely to demonstrate social goals, partner preferences, and a perception of the future also consistent with those of an older adult. Participants will complete a Big Five Inventory, a Future Time Perspective Scale, a questionnaire about goals, and a questionnaire and hypothetical scenario regarding partner preferences. A median split will be used to conclude which personalities rank the oldest based on levels of Big Five traits, and individual traits will also be examined independently. It is predicted that 18-22-year-olds who exhibit BFI scores relatively similar to what is typical of older adults will also tend to: set social goals more related to emotion regulation than social acceptance or autonomy, prefer a familiar partner to a new relationship, and view the future as relatively limited rather than expansive.

Faculty Sponsor

Christopher Soto

Sponsoring Department

Colby College. Psychology Dept.

CLAS Field of Study

Social Sciences

Event Website

http://www.colby.edu/clas

ID

102

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May 1st, 1:00 PM May 1st, 2:00 PM

How Old is Your Personality? An Exploration of How Big Five Traits Mediate Time Perspective, Social Goals, and Partner Preferences in College Students.

Parker-Reed, SSWAC

The current study will explore if views on time and social motivation can be explained by personality traits. Because there tend to be significant differences in the Big Five domains as a function of age, the proposed research will investigate whether a college-aged student with Big Five scores consistent with those typically found in older adults (high Conscientiousness, high Agreeableness, low Extraversion, low Neuroticism, and low Openness) would be more likely to demonstrate social goals, partner preferences, and a perception of the future also consistent with those of an older adult. Participants will complete a Big Five Inventory, a Future Time Perspective Scale, a questionnaire about goals, and a questionnaire and hypothetical scenario regarding partner preferences. A median split will be used to conclude which personalities rank the oldest based on levels of Big Five traits, and individual traits will also be examined independently. It is predicted that 18-22-year-olds who exhibit BFI scores relatively similar to what is typical of older adults will also tend to: set social goals more related to emotion regulation than social acceptance or autonomy, prefer a familiar partner to a new relationship, and view the future as relatively limited rather than expansive.

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/clas/2014/program/190